Radiomics in Clinical Trials – The Rationale, Current Practices, and Future Considerations

Radiomics involves deep quantitative analysis of radiological images for structural and/or functional information. – It is a phenomic assessment of disease to understand lesion microstructure, microenvironment and molecular/cellular function. – In oncology, it helps us accurately classify, stratify and prognosticate tumors based on if, how and when they transform, infiltrate, involute or metastasize, – Utilizing radiomics in clinical trials is exploratory, and not an established end-point. – Integrating radiomics in an imaging-based clinical trials involves a streamlined workflow to handle large datasets, robust platforms to accommodate machine learning calculations, and seamless incorporation of derived insights into outcomes matrix.

Reporter Gene Imaging and its Role in Imaging-Based Drug Development.

This abstract presents how RGI can be used in drug development for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic assessment of cellular, gene, oncolytic viral and immunotherapeutic approaches using MRI, PET, SPECT, Ultrasound, Bioluminescence and Fluoroscence.  Some of the teaching points include further insight into RGI imaging probes that can be direct, indirect or activable; range from enzymes, protein receptors and cell membrane transporters and how RGI qualitatively and quantitatively assesses cell targeting, transfection, protein expression and intracellular processes.

Imaging in Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

Abstract

In suspected and diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows detection of all relevant pathologies, such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, bone marrow edema (osteitis), bone erosion and cartilage damage. MRI is more sensitive than clinical examination for monitoring disease activity (i.e., inflammation) and more sensitive than conventional radiography and ultrasonography for monitoring joint destruction. In suspected RA, MRI bone marrow edema predicts development of RA, and in early RA patients, it predicts subsequent structural damage progression. CT is the standard reference imaging modality for visualizing bone damage, including bone erosions in RA, but lacks sensitivity for soft-tissue changes, including synovitis and tenosynovitis. CT has a minimal role in RA clinical trials and practice, except in selected patients where MRI is contraindicated or not available or if crystal arthritis such as gout or pseudo-gout is suspected. MRI has documented utility in diagnosis, monitoring and prognostication of patients with RA and is increasingly used for these purposes in clinical practice and particularly clinical trials.