Dual-Energy CT for Suspected Radiographically Negative Wrist Fractures: A Prospective Diagnostic Test Accuracy Study.

In this prospective study, dual-energy CT and MRI had a similarly high sensitivity and specificity in helping detect radiographically negative wrist fractures. Dual-energy CT had a high sensitivity and a moderate specificity in the detection of bone marrow edema of the wrist. Dual-energy CT had high sensitivity and specificity in depicting fractures of the wrist in patients with suspected wrist fractures and negative findings on radiographs.

Radiomics in Clinical Trials – The Rationale, Current Practices, and Future Considerations

Radiomics involves deep quantitative analysis of radiological images for structural and/or functional information. – It is a phenomic assessment of disease to understand lesion microstructure, microenvironment and molecular/cellular function. – In oncology, it helps us accurately classify, stratify and prognosticate tumors based on if, how and when they transform, infiltrate, involute or metastasize, – Utilizing radiomics in clinical trials is exploratory, and not an established end-point. – Integrating radiomics in an imaging-based clinical trials involves a streamlined workflow to handle large datasets, robust platforms to accommodate machine learning calculations, and seamless incorporation of derived insights into outcomes matrix.

Reporter Gene Imaging and its Role in Imaging-Based Drug Development.

This abstract presents how RGI can be used in drug development for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic assessment of cellular, gene, oncolytic viral and immunotherapeutic approaches using MRI, PET, SPECT, Ultrasound, Bioluminescence and Fluoroscence.  Some of the teaching points include further insight into RGI imaging probes that can be direct, indirect or activable; range from enzymes, protein receptors and cell membrane transporters and how RGI qualitatively and quantitatively assesses cell targeting, transfection, protein expression and intracellular processes.

Richter Transformation of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Review of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography–Computed Tomography and Molecular Diagnostics

Copyright © 2017 © 2017, Shaikh et al.
Cureus. 2017 Jan;9(1) doi: 10.7759/cureus.968

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a low-grade B-cell proliferative disease with a generally indolent course. In a few cases, it undergoes transformation and becomes a more aggressive malignancy, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This process, which is called Richter transformation (RT), is often detected too late and is associated with a poor prognosis. There are multiple molecular diagnostic approaches to detect RT in preexisting CLL. Metabolic imaging using 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography–computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) can be a very useful tool for early detection of RT and which can hence allow for timely intervention, thereby improving the patient’s chances of survival.

The Role of Dual-Energy Computed Tomography in Musculoskeletal Imaging

Abstract

Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) enables material decomposition and virtual monochromatic images by acquiring 2 different energy X-ray data sets. DECT can detect musculoskeletal pathologic conditions that CT alone cannot, and that would otherwise require MR imaging. In this review, the authors discuss several useful techniques and applications of DECT in musculoskeletal research: virtual monochromatic images, virtual noncalcium images, gout, iodine map, and tendons.

KEY POINTS
 Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) can reduce beam hardening artifacts by synthesizing a
virtual monochromatic image and enables detailed evaluation of prosthetic complications.
 DECT can display monosodium urate crystal deposition, which helps to make a correct diagnosis in
atypical gout and precise therapeutic assessment.
 DECT iodine maps can delineate soft tissue inflammation of arthritis and may be beneficial for
evaluating peripheral joints because of its high spatial resolution.