Just published new data on the tissue regeneration after the muscle injury, using MRI and DCE-MRI.

Just published new data on the tissue regeneration after the muscle injury, using MRI and DCE-MRI.

Just published new data on the tissue regeneration after the muscle injury, using MRI and DCE-MRI.

These are the results of the randomized controlled trial comparing early and delayed rehabilitation after muscle injury, impacting the return to sport and re-occurrence of the injury. This original paper published with our scientific and medical colleagues in Sn J. of Med and Science in Sport focuses on the role of tissue perfusion, muscle strength and pain in rehabilitation. It follows the data presented earlier in New England J. of medicine, http://www.ia-grp.com/news/clinical-trial-muscle/

The goal of this paper was to examine tissue regeneration after the injury, using MRI and DCE-MRI data from 50 recreational athletes with a severe acute strain injury in their thigh or calf muscles.

MRI was obtained at baseline, 3 and 6 months post injury. Muscle strength was determined 5 weeks, 3 months and 6 months postinjury, and a questionnaire determined soreness, pain, and confidence.

The authors showed that tissue repair is a prolonged process that lasts for at least 6 months after a severe muscle strain injury. Often, the tissue is not fully normalized at the time when athletes resume full physical activity at pre injury level. This was illustrated through quantitative DCE-MRI analysis on muscle done with IAG’s DYNAMIKA platform.

The article gives insight into the tight relation between the muscle volume reduction at 3 and 6 months postinjury and the increased tissue perfusion. It links the magnitude of the trauma, the inflammatory response, and muscle atrophy.

While using sports injury group for this investigation, it is important to note that muscle and its strength and quality are important factors in many other disease areas, from osteoarthritis, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, sarcopenia. It was very important to see that advanced imaging such as DCE-MRI offer predictive value in relation to muscle atrophy and the volumetric changes.

The authors perspective is that ‘t is important that future studies on human muscle strains address the question related to the time course of tissue healing, the specific tissues involved, including the connective tissue, and if inflammatory processes are associated with the risk of re injuries.’

 

Role of tissue perfusion, muscle strength recovery, and pain in rehabilitation after acute muscle strain injury: A randomized controlled trial comparing early and delayed rehabilitation, Monika L. Bayer , Maren Hoegberget‐Kalisz, Mikkel H. Jensen , Jens L. Olesen, Rene B. Svensson , Christian Couppé , Mikael Boesen , Janus D. Nybing , Engin Y. Kurt , S. Peter Magnusson , Michael Kjaer, First published: 25 July 2018, 

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